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The UK TeX Users Group is organising another introductory LaTeX course on April 15th, 2011 in Cambridge.

Using LaTeX to Write a Thesis

This course is aimed at beginners and will cover a range of topics connected with writing a dissertation in LaTeX, including:

  • Installing LaTeX for the first time
  • Creating a document
  • Document structure
  • Graphics
  • Managing a bibliography with BibTeX

Registration

The course only costs £10, so I imagine places will be taken very quickly.

To register, e-mail Joseph Wright <joseph.wright@morningstar2.co.uk> and include:

  • Your completed UK-TUG membership form as an attachment (a year’s membership is included in the course fee)
  • Details of your LaTeX experience (if any), including which operating system you use
  • What your general subject area is (to help plan the course content)

Useful Links

Full details of the course and more information about booking conditions are posted here: http://uk.tug.org/2011/03/12/latex-training-course-15th-april-2011-cambridge/

In London on July 30th the UK TeX Users Group and the University of East Anglia will be running a course on how to use LaTeX to write a thesis.

Course Content

You don’t need to be an expert to take part – the course is aimed at people new to LaTeX. The topics covered include:

  • Creating a document
  • Document structure
  • Graphics
  • Managing a bibliography with BibTeX

Registration

The course only costs £10, so I imagine places will be taken very quickly.

To register, e-mail Joseph Wright <joseph.wright@morningstar2.co.uk> and include:

  • Details of your LaTeX experience (if any)
  • If you’re bringing a laptop  with you to the course
  • What your general subject area is (to help plan the course content)
  • Any special requirements (diet, access, etc.)

Useful Links

Full details of the course (including the programme) are posted here: http://uk.tug.org/2010/06/17/latex-training-course-using-latex-to-write-a-thesis/.

The bottom line: if you’re writing a short document in English with no special characters, use Microsoft Word.

For longer documents, like a masters or doctoral dissertation – invest your time in learning how to use LaTeX.

LaTeX lets you concentrate on what you are writing, not what it looks like. It’s efficient – formatting, structuring, numbering, indexing and referencing are all taken care of – you can just write.

Advantages of using LaTeX

  • excellent support for transliteration and for non-latin alphabets
  • separation of content and style (you type, it makes it pretty)
  • scalability – LaTeX can be used for a one-page letter or a 300 page book
  • high quality output – PDFs produced look elegant and professional
  • performance – LaTeX doesn’t crash like Word
  • can be used with the bibliography/reference package, BibTeX
  • files are very small – a LaTeX file is just a text file
  • it’s free
  • platform independent – can be used on Windows, Macs, Linux
  • you never have to write an English/Arabic document in Word again!

Disadvantages of using LaTeX

  • it can be a bit overwhelming at first
  • learning how to use it takes time
  • complicated workflow – there are several steps to write, generate and produce a finished file
  • just as with any software, there are occasional bugs – but I’ve only come across one so far

Summary

I use LaTeX because of its excellent handling of Arabic script, transliteration and typesetting control. If any of the above sounds interesting, read on and try it out.

Useful links to reviews of LaTeX

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